Njoku is certainly a player to watch in Indy

The Patriots shared this with the Cavaliers, too — shutting down the reigning Most Valuable Player along the way. Stephen Curry couldn’t complete the back-to-back NBA titles to go with the back-to-back MVPs, largely because the Cavs had a past battle-tested MVP of their own in LeBron James.

Brady was LeBron to Matt Ryan, the Falcons’ Curry. (In the Cubs’ favor: they had the National League MVP on their side, Kris Bryant.)

To go a step further, for a rare moment Brady looked rattled and borderline out of his own usually-steady head at one point, after he threw the first pick-six of his playoff career, in the second quarter, to give the Falcons the 21-0 lead.

So no, three such comebacks happening in essentially one major-league sports season has never happened. The odds would be astronomical, and would get steeper, of course, as each sport reached its championship round.

Njoku is certainly a player to watch in Indy, and it shouldn’t surprise when he shows out. What does he expect?

“That’s a great question,” Njoku told Sporting News. “I’m just trying to be the best I can be, feel fresh and compete so I can show the world what I can do.”

Njoku finished with 43 catches for 698 yards — an average of 16.2 yards per catch — with eight TDs for the Hurricanes in 2016. He came to Miami as a 217-pound receiver. He leaves as its next NFL-bound tight end.

Njoku would be the 10th Miami tight end drafted since 2000, when Green Bay selected Bubba Franks with the No. 14 pick. Since then, Jeremy Shockey (2002), Kellen Winslow II (2004) and Greg Olsen were first-round picks, and Kevin Everett (2005), Jimmy Graham (2010) and Clive Walford (2015) were third-round picks. Njoku easily could be the next first-round pick, and he understands what comes with that responsibility.
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