Offensive plays would be called based on stolen signals and the information relayed straight to Brady’s helmet, O’Leary theorizes.

After all, the NFL, which will now aggressively pursue charges of gross, bigoted conduct — the violation of a teammate’s civil rights — by Incognito, chose Lewis as the man to appear in commercials to push NFL-licensed goods.

Such a preposterous, perverse story would be rejected as impossibly dark and detached fiction, yet the NFL and one of its biggest business partner networks were more than compliant in allowing it to happen — they made it happen!

O’Leary — who uses data crunched by a Las Vegas bookie and a Ph.D. statistician from China with no previous familiarity with Spygate — suggests Patriots “director of football research” Ernie Adams, a prep-school chum of Belichick from Phillips Academy in Andover, Mass., was the nerve center behind the chicanery.

In this scenario, the extra frequency is critical, as it allows the team to do something in real time with the stolen signals, out of earshot of the NFL monitor, and change its plays accordingly.

The loss of Odell Beckham for Sunday’s matchup definitely didn’t help, but even with him in the lineup, it’s hard to imagine the Giants looking much better. The bad news for America is that we’re going to be stuck watching the Giants offense again in Week 2 because they’re playing on Monday Night Football.

If the Cowboys defense was supposed to be the team’s weak link this season, then the rest of the NFL might be in trouble, because the unit absolutely shut down the Giants on Sunday Night Football. During the Cowboys’ win, Dallas limited the Giants to just 224 total yards, marking just the fifth time since 2012 that the Cowboys have held a team under 225 yards. The three points allowed marked just the second time since 2010 that the Cowboys gave up three points or fewer in a game.

Since Week 2, the Saints rank among the top four defenses in yards allowed, points allowed and forced